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Great Reads: Book Club Listings From Across the Region

If you can't make it to the Book Clubs for the discussions, you can still be up on what everyone else is reading, and never be at a loss for a good book.

The role of libraries is shifting with the times.  Whether you prefer your books in hardcover, paperback or on a CD, book clubs offer ways for people in communities to connect.  

If you spend too much time at Starbucks or Dunkin' Donuts, check out the other best place to run into your friends and neighbors. 

Libraries across the region host at least one book vlub a month, and some as many as three. Bethel hosts fiction and non-fiction clubs as does Southbury, which also hosts a parenting book club.

At the Danbury Public Library last year, over 2,199 people participated in the One Book, One Community program, and almost 1,000 people turned out to hear an author speak, according to Library Director Mark Hasskarl.

 Residents gather at the Woodbury Library to discuss essays written about Great Decisions that resulted in war, peace, and other outcomes.

Mothers know that book readings for tykes and programs for the K-12 set are free and easy for the whole family, but in these economic times, there are great things for everyone to take advantage of in their home town library. 

 Whether you prefer to engage in a chess game in Monroe, watch an afternoon movie for free in Woodbury, check your e-mail, learn a foreign language, or argue politics, there is an awful lot going on in libraries these days. 

If you are too busy to joing the clubs, you can still be in the loop with what your community is reading. Here is a list of what the libraries in the region are serving up. If you are short on good books to read, never fear, we will run a new list every month. 

Monroe Edith Wheeler Memorial Library: Tends to read older or obscure books that have literary value rather than bestsellers. You will discover books you might never have known existed. Currently reading "The White Tiger" by Avarind Adiga, and described in their brochure as, “A story of wit, blistering suspense and questionable morality.”

Southbury Library: "Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science" by Dava Sobel, for the non-fiction book club. "The Tower, The Zoo and The Tortoise" by Julia Stewart for the fiction book club, and The Parenting Book Club is reading "The Pretty Little Liars" Series by Sara Shepard.

The Bethel Library: Reading "Brooklyn" by Colm Toibin

Oxford Library: Currently reading "Hearts of Horses" by Molly Gloss. The book is described as a sort of cowgirl/horse whisperer story based around the time of World War 1.

Newtown Library: Currently reading three books. "Salt, A World History" by Mark Kurlansky, "The Lacuna" by Barbara Kingsolver and "Learning to Die in Miami" by Carolos Eire.

Woodbury Public Library: "Please Look After Mom" by Kyong-Sook Shin

Danbury Public Library: "The Imperfectionists" by Tom Rachman

Howard Whittemore Memorial Library, Naugatuck: Jane Eyre by Bronte

Brookfield Library: The Likeness by Tana French, a book of suspenseful fiction.

lighthouse November 28, 2011 at 11:59 AM
AOL EARNINGS??????????????? READING IS NEWS. AND PEOPLE CAN READ ITEMS ON THIS SITE, ALSO VOICE THEIR OPIONS AND BE HEARD. HAVE YOU SEEN MUCH IF AT ALL GOSSIP ON THIS SITE? WHAT KIND OF NEWS DO YOU WANT, THE DIRT. JUST WATCH T.V. THIS SITE IS NEW AND IT WILL GROW. IF YOUR SO CONCERNED ABOUT THE AOL EARNINGS YOU SHOULD GET OUT OF THE STOCK MARKET.
Yarel Silverio Marshall November 28, 2011 at 02:09 PM
Thank you for this article! I look to the Patch to keep me updated on happenings at Southbury. I have always found the Tag Sale listings helpful and I hope you will consider doing the same with area book clubs. I run the Parent/Parenting Book Club at the Southbury Public Library and we usually meet on the third Thursday of the month at 10a. For Dec. 15, we are reading "How to Talk so Kids Can Learn." Thank you again!
Observer November 28, 2011 at 03:05 PM
lol, I'm not really sure where to start with this one ;)
Observer November 28, 2011 at 03:19 PM
Yep - unfortunately, Patch is a sinking ship. It's a shame because it truly had the ability to redefine community news. Any local Patch costs approximately $150,000 to run - that's $160 million a year. No wonder editors are reporting travesties like this: http://tinyurl.com/c25dqyl. As many have pointed out, it's a lack of relevant content and consistent quality that are contributing to Patch's troubles. This story (which is a good story, but does NOT belong as the top story of the day, ESPECIALLY on a Sunday) is a shining example of that.
alace3 December 27, 2011 at 05:47 PM
'Observer' and 'Baffled and Confused': there are many online news-savvy places for you to get the type of material you find interesting and news-worthy; you should not be so conceited to think your interests are the interests driving the entire community. There is a niche here that the patch fills for people in our state. I personally was happy to see an article extolling the many book listings from across the region. If you're not happy, surf somewhere else and don't fill our pages with your snobby banter!

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